The Lancet Oncology published a study last week that shows oral estrogen may decrease the risk of invasive breast cancer in women with a hysterectomy compared to those who received a placebo. This is another study that comes from the Women’s Health Initiative. If you are not familiar with the Women’s Health

I have taken care of breast cancer patients as a surgeon for over 25 years. It is a devastating diagnosis because of the severity of the treatments and because it affects so many young women. As I treat women with hormonal imbalance now, I have a different understanding of the importance of

I just saw a patient in my surgical practice with her second primary breast cancer. I took care of her with her first one 11 years ago, and this time she needed a mastectomy. She had been on premarin for about 20 years before her first diagnosis. She is likely to do

Recently, a new analysis of the women involved in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) was published in the October 20th issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. In the new report, researchers have found that hormone replacement therapy not only increased the risk of breast cancer in women, but also the likelihood that she would die from the disease. While these findings may seem alarming at first, it’s important that you don’t let the media scare you into believing that all hormones are bad for you.

Finally, authors who are willing to look at the “good news” results from the WHI and to look at the hormone that is actually causing the increase in breast cancer – it’s the progestin, not the estrogen. As the authors state this is old news, in the WHI it was clearly shown that women who took estrogen only did have a decreased risk of breast cancer. Even though as the authors state that overall the reduction did not reach clinical significance, the message that is important is that estrogen alone did not INCREASE the risk of breast cancer. The only group that showed an increased risk of breast cancer was the group where estrogens were combined with progestin (an artificial form of progesterone).

Once again physicians are looking at the WHI results and trying to justify the use of Premarin. One has to wonder, given all we know about how toxic this drug is, why do they continue to do so? I wonder if there is a financial incentive from the drug company that manufactures Premarin. I would be curious about who is funding their research. The WHI study used Premarin, a form of estrogen hormone replacement therapy (EHRT) derived from the urine of pregant mares. It is well known to increase the risk of breast cancer, blood clots, and do little to prevent age-related, degenerative diseases, such as dementia or osteoporosis.

I know that my patients and their friends are an internet and media savvy group. As such, I am sure they are aware of the recently released JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association) article that dealt with the incidence of breast cancer in patients undergoing long-term follow-up in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) studies. This study was released several years ago after analyzing the results of giving hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in the form of synthetic Progestins (progesterone-like molecules) and Estrogens (Premarin) derived from horse urine which are most definitely NOT the same as human estrogen. Ultimately the study was discontinued because of the statistically increased incidence of cardiovascular disease and uterine cancer. The most recent data analysis looks at the incidence of breast cancer and it's complications in women from the original study who were followed for an additional 4 years. The results showed that there was a significantly increased incidence of breast cancer as well as the metastatic consequences of those cancers in the women who were given the synthetic hormones.

In a new analysis of the women involved in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI), researchers discovered that synthetic hormone replacement therapy used after menopause not only increased the risk of breast cancer in women, but also increased their risk of dying from the disease, when compared with women who did not receive treatment. These new findings were recently published in the October 20th issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. The WHI was a federally funded study that analyzed more than16,500 postmenopausal women who were given either hormone replacement therapy or a placebo.

Recently, a new analysis of the women involved in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) was published in October 20th issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). In the new report, researchers have found that hormone replacement therapy not only increased the risk of breast cancer in women, but also the likelihood that she would die from the disease. While these findings may seem alarming at first, it’s important that you don’t let the media scare you into believing that all hormones are bad for you.

The media spotlight has honed in on hormone therapy once again, after the most recent findings from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) were published in last Wednesday’s issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association and once again women all over the world were done a huge disservice.

There’s a lot of talk in the media regarding the dangers of hormone therapy. Apparently new studies have shown that hormone therapy is more dangerous than doctors originally thought. I’ve been using bioidentical hormones for 9 months now and I’m concerned that I might be putting myself at risk for breast cancer and heart disease. My doctor tells me that bioidentical hormones are different than the hormones that were used in the WHI trials and that there dangerous side effects aren’t as common because bioidentical hormones are naturally occurring. In your opinion, what makes bioidentical hormones safer and/or more effective than other forms of HRT?

One of the main criticisms of bioidentical hormone therapy is that “there are no studies on bioidentical hormones.” In fact, there are many excellent publications that demonstrate the benefits of bioidentical hormone therapy. Some of the studies show a greater margin of safety with bioidentical progesterone over the non-bioidentical progestin, Provera. Those that support Premarin and Provera point to a number of studies that were done. However, 26 of them were biased and, what’s worse, the bias was covered up. If Wyeth needed to “give credit” to other physicians for their research on their own products, what were they trying to cover up? What did they know that they weren’t saying? Why weren’t there independent groups that could have demonstrated the benefits of Premarin and Provera?

Wyeth has a big presence in hormone replacement therapy, selling drugs women use to treat the symptoms of menopause. Sales of Wyeth's hormone replacement drugs, Premarin and Prempro, reached nearly $2 billion in 2001. The field took a big hit in 2002, when a large federal study found that women who took certain hormones had a higher risk of breast cancer, heart disease and stroke.

Newsweek recently published a scathing article about Oprah titled "Why Health Advice on Oprah could make you sick." In it, Weston Kosova and Pat Wingert criticize Oprah for having Suzanne Somers on her show as the "expert" on bioidentical hormones. Dr. Alicia Stanton, CMO of BodyLogicMD shares her thoughts on Kosova and Wingert's criticisms.

I know that there is a middle ground in the bioidentical hormone debate. Suzanne Somers is on one side of the debate. I would welcome another show with Dr. Streicher, Dr. Northrup and a few doctors who use the lower dose regimens and combinations of pharmaceutical and compounded prescriptions. Many of the physicians trained by the American Academy of Anti-Aging and the Institute of Functional Medicine practice in a more conservative manner than what was described on Oprah’s shows. Overall, I love the conversation and the fact that there are so many points of view. It gives everyone a chance to ask questions and learn more for themselves.

The information provided on this blog is for reference use only, and does not constitute the rendering of legal, financial or other professional advice or recommendations by the BodyLogicMD affiliated physician. This page is not for the use of diagnosing and/or treating medical issues.