Antidepressants Linked to Increased Risk of Stoke & Heart Attack in Women

December 18, 2009

According to recent findings from the study known as the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), women who use antidepressants to treat depression have a higher risk of stroke and heart attack.

In fact, studies indicated a higher mortality rate in menopausal and post-menopausal women who use selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI’s) than women who weren’t treated for depression, regardless of the cause of death. Unfortunately, it’s still unclear as to what the cause for the elevated risk is. Some believe that the medications play a role; while others feel strongly that the depression itself is the cause and insist that the drugs are safe.

Depression is a grueling and debilitating condition that affects millions of American women and men each year. America is said to be the most overly medicated nation on the planet and our indisputable drug of choice: antidepressants. Antidepressants such as Zoloft, Lexapro and Celexa have already been linked to an array of adverse reactions and side effects including dry mouth, fatigue, nausea and anxiety, and in some cases have even been found to exacerbate depression. Still, Neurologists argue that depression left untreated poses a greater threat than any of the drugs currently on the market, used to treat depression. Depression in itself has been linked to heart disease and in some cases even death. Being that depression is a neurological disorder, it has a direct impact on just about every aspect of our lives.

It’s important to understand that although depression can be damaging, there are natural treatments available that can help men and women overcome many if not all of the symptoms. The best way to treat depression is to determine the root cause. Although the causes for depression may vary from person to person, certain hormonal and metabolic imbalances can manifest themselves into symptoms that are commonly written off as a part of growing old. Symptoms include depression, anxiety, weight gain, fatigue, foggy thinking and frequent mood swings. If the depression is stemming from a hormonal imbalance, which is common for men and women over the age of 35, there are natural alternatives to prescription drugs, namely bioidentical hormones that can effectively relieve symptoms attributed to hormonal imbalance without the negative side effects. Bioidentical hormones are identical to the hormones that the body produces naturally; molecule by molecule. Based on the results of diagnostic and genomic testing, a bioidentical hormones expert can prescribe women and men a customized regimen of bioidentical hormones, individually tailored to meet the needs of each patient. With a combination of all natural bioidentical hormone replacement therapy (BHRT), customized fitness and nutrition programs, as well as stress management techniques, depression and other symptoms of hormonal imbalance can be a thing of the past.

One Response to Antidepressants Linked to Increased Risk of Stoke & Heart Attack in Women

  1. incostress says:

    Excellent report. Well worth reading. Antidepressants are given out too freely and people accept them too easily. Antidepressants are given to women suffering incontinence. It would be interesting to find out how many incontinent women have suffered a heart attack after being prescribed this sort of medication. My mother died at the age of 59 suffering a heart attack. She had been years on antidepressants due to her incontinence problem. Interesting.

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